Abstract

Under certain conditions the spectral emission (or absorption) of bands of molecules in the gaseous state may be described with the help of the “statistical” model. A new method is developed in order to correlate the observed emissivity of a statistical band with the experimental parameters of the gas (pressure, optical path, etc.). Use is made of curves of growth for every frequency in the band, and the method is applied to the region of the 4.3-μ bands of CO2 at a temperature of 1200°K. Experimental results for CO2 are described, which were obtained by heating the gas in cells of different length in an electrical furnace. Good quantitative agreement is found with experimental results of other workers. It is shown that the statistical model predicts the emissivity correctly over wide ranges of pressure and optical path.

© 1963 Optical Society of America

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