Abstract

Telecommunications service providers (SP) should place survivability expectations by guaranteeing maximal allowed system downtime for service-level agreement (SLA)-differentiated services. Furthermore, SPs should continuously focus on utilizing network resources effectively, by considering the bounded network capacity and the growth of future data traffic. In order to improve different service availabilities and achieve high resource efficiency, we present a novel restoration scheme by jointly considering accumulated downtime and SLA requirements of faulty connections. While most past related works have focused on providing statistical guarantees on availability when a connection is provisioned, our current approach recognizes that, after a connection has been in existence, it could be “ahead” (or “behind”) its performance guarantee based on what network outages it might have experienced, so the resources allocated to it may be revised judiciously. When a link failure occurs, two sets of faulty connections are examined: (a) connections whose primary or restoration path is disrupted by the failure and (b) connections that are in the “down” state due to some previous failures (which have not been repaired yet). An affected connection is switched to its pre-computed or an alternate restoration path if necessary, when its accumulated downtime plus the link repair time will exceed its SLA requirement. The scheme provides differentiated restoration to existing connections upon a link failure in order to satisfy the connections’ availability requirements. We also propose an upgraded version of the scheme that incorporates both excess capacity and resource preemption into the scheme. Given the network capacities and the current network state including routing information for all existing connections, a faulty connection is restored to its restoration path as long as there is enough excess capacity along the path. Otherwise, when protection switching of a high-SLA connection fails due to limited bandwidth on some link(s), it preempts restoration capacity on each link from a low-SLA connection if both disrupted connections share the same restoration capacity and the availability requirement of the low-SLA connection is not violated. Finally, we report simulation results for a large carrier-scale network to show computational performance of our proposed algorithm. The results demonstrate that the algorithm achieves a high availability satisfaction rate and good resource utilization, as well as greatly reduces protection-switching overhead.

© 2009 Optical Society of America

Full Article  |  PDF Article
OSA Recommended Articles
Exploiting Excess Capacity for Survivable Traffic Grooming in Optical Backbone Networks

Ferhat Dikbiyik, Massimo Tornatore, and Biswanath Mukherjee
J. Opt. Commun. Netw. 6(2) 127-137 (2014)

Adaptive Reliable Multipath Provisioning in Survivable WDM Mesh Networks

Sheng Huang, Chip Martel, and Biswanath Mukherjee
J. Opt. Commun. Netw. 2(6) 368-380 (2010)

Restoration in Optical Cloud Networks With Relocation and Services Differentiation

Carlos Natalino da Silva, Lena Wosinska, Salvatore Spadaro, João C. W. A. Costa, Carlos R. L. Francês, and Paolo Monti
J. Opt. Commun. Netw. 8(2) 100-111 (2016)

References

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Citation lists with outbound citation links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Cited By

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Cited by links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Figures (5)

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Figure files are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Tables (2)

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Article tables are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Equations (4)

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Equations are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription